Woodhull Institute for Ethical Leadership
TEACHING THE COMPASSIONATE USE OF POWER
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Women

22
Jun

Paradigm Shift NYC Presents a Screening and Discussion of
Not Dead Yet (2009)

Join Woodhull and Paradigm Shift for this screening and discussion featuring:

Susan Hess Logeais, Producer & Star
& Jennifer Pozner, Women In Media & News

Wednesday July 6th, 2011 6:30pm

Roy Arias Studios
300 W. 43rd. St. Ste. 402 (corner of 8th Ave), NYC
Subway: A,C,E to 42nd Street/Times Square

Buy Tickets Today!

$15 online, $20 door

For more information & trailer www.ParadigmShiftNYC.com

Category : Community Member Projects and Updates | Culture | Events | Media | Women | Blog
16
May

Originally posted to my blog ReelGirl on May 14th.

Why write fiction?

I’ve always loved to, but I also felt like it didn’t matter as much. Writing about politics and culture is important. If you write about ‘issues,’ you can use your writing to change the world. Or try to. Making up stories might be fun but what’s the point?

Then I had three kids. Of course, I read my daughters stories, watch movies with them, and also, TV shows. I witness how the stories they listen to shape their imaginary play, how they dress, who their heroes are, the language they repeat, the art they make, and their own creative writing.

In her best-selling book Cinderella Ate My Daughter, Peggy Orenstein writes extensively about children’s brain development, how babies don’t come into the world with fully formed minds that we, parents, are just supposed to observe and discover. Their brains are constantly being formed, rapidly growing and changing as they take in language, pictures, adult reactions, and all kinds of stimuli. Neurons fire in reaction, neural pathways are formed, and connections are created, assimilating the outside world to create the internal one.

So I’ve got to wonder: How might kids’ brains (and then, of course, adult brains) be different if the stories they were exposed to weren’t so dramatically and predominantly shaped by men?

continue

Category : Community Member Projects and Updates | Culture | Media | Women | Blog
13
May

Check out member of  Woodhull’s Faculty, Joyce McFadden’s new book Your Daughter’s Bedroom: Insights for Raising Confident Women.

“A fascinating and empowering text for women of all ages.”
–Publishers Weekly

“Your Daughter’s Healthy Identity Starts With You.

After psychoanalyst Joyce McFadden treated countless women who felt alone and isolated in experiences that they were unaware many other women were dealing with too, she began to ask what she could do to help them reach out to each other.  The result was the launch of her Women’s Realities Study in which she interviewed hundreds of women from ages 18-105, about the most private issues as she sought to understand what events in a woman’s life impact her future happiness and self-confidence. What McFadden found was truly revealing— the theme that most interested them as they explored their identities was how their relationship with their mothers influenced their understanding of themselves as sexual beings throughout their lives—from the time they were little girls straight through adulthood.

Drawing on over a thousand responses, Your Daughter’s Bedroom offers a new and unprecedented look at the mother-daughter bond. McFadden argues that the type of womanhood mothers model for their daughters determines the young girls’ comfort with their own bodies which, in turn, leads to confidence and satisfaction later in life.

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Category : Community Member Projects and Updates | Culture | Women | Blog
12
May

Originally posted to my blog ReelGirl on May 12th.

Sugar In My Bowl, edited by Erica Jong, is a collection of essays and short fiction about female sexuality by writers like Julie Klam, Fay Weldon, Jennifer Weiner, and many others including me. The book is coming out June 14, but you can preorder it on Amazon.

Sugar In My Bowl

Gail Collins, an op-ed columnist for the New York Times, has a hilarious essay in the book that describes how her Catholic education warped her perceptions of sex.

She writes:”I was possibly one of the least sophisticated teenagers in the United States outside of Amish country, and although I knew the mechanics of how babies were made, I had not yet really come around to imagining that people actually did that kind of thing voluntarily.”

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Category : Community Member Projects and Updates | Culture | Women | Blog
27
Apr
PARADIGM SHIFT: NYC’S FEMINIST COMMUNITY Proudly Presents
DANGEROUS TERRITORY

Thursday, May 19th
7:00 pm
Just outside the Feminist District
The Tank- 354 West 45th Street (between 8th and 9th Avenues)
Subway: A,C,E to 42nd Street/Times Square

FACEBOOK INVITE: http://on.fb.me/fI7lXD

$12 students/ pre-paid, $15 at door

Limited Seating, Buy Tickets Today!

Category : Culture | Events | Women | Blog
28
Mar

Woodhull celebrates the life of the first woman who ran for Vice President of the United States of America, Geraldine Ferraro. Here is a collection of the many tributes to her life and legacy:

She Ended the Men’s Club of National Politics“- New York Times

Remembering Geraldine Ferraro: A woman of firsts” – NY Daily News

Congresswoman Made History on National Ticket“- The Wall Street Journal

Category : News | Women | Blog
15
Mar

Check out Woodhull Alumna, Courtney Martin’s “Reinventing Feminism” as she examines the perennially loaded word “feminism” in this personal and heartfelt talk. She talks through the three essential paradoxes of her generation’s quest to define the term for themselves. Read Courtney’s full bio at TED.com

Category : Community Member Projects and Updates | Culture | Women | Blog
11
Mar

Woodhull Alumna, Sunny Sea Gold’s  new book comes out April 5th, 2011!

Sunny Sea Gold started fighting a binge eating disorder in her teens. But most books on the topic were aimed at older women, women she had a hard time relating to. Calling on top psychiatrists, nutritionists, and fitness experts, Sunny offers real advice to a new generation fighting an age-old war. With humor and compassion from someone who’s seen it all, Food: The Good Girl’s Drug is about experiences shared by many women-whether they’ve been struggling with compulsive overeating their whole lives, or have just admitted to themselves, that yes, it’s more than just a bad habit.  Pre-Order your copy today at Amazon.com!

Sunny Sea Gold is deputy editor at Redbook and former health editor at Glamour and Seventeen. Her writing has appeared in Real Simple, Best Life, Psychology Today and many other publication. Check out Sunny’s organziation Healthygirl.org

Category : Community Member Projects and Updates | Women | Blog
10
Mar

By Lisa Hix, Woodhull Alumna
Originally posted to Collectors Weekly on March 8th.

Today, in 1911, German activist Clara Zetkin launched the first ever International Women’s Day, to honor the political, economic, and social achievements of women worldwide. Certainly over this past century, life has improved for women by leaps and bounds—perhaps at a rate menfolk sometimes found alarming.

Lately, we’ve been fascinated with the American fear of robots, something both “Robopocalypse” screenwriter Daniel H. Wilson and post-war toy robot collector Justin Pinchot discussed with us.

But what happens when you put fear of women and fear of technology into the same sci-fi stew? You get “fembots,” or often-deadly robots designed to evoke the appearance and mannerisms of beautiful women.

Over at Show & Tell, electobacco posted this 12-inch cool Fembot action figure (made by Kenner, which also produced the original Star Wars action figures). Not—as some young ‘uns might guess—from the “Austin Powers” film series, but from the late 1970s TV show, “The Bionic Woman,” the female-centered cyborg spin-off of “The Six Million Dollar Man.”

Continue Reading Full Article Here

Category : Community Member Projects and Updates | Culture | Media | Women | Blog
7
Mar

Who was one of the greatest female film and fashion icons of the 20th Century?

Audrey Hepburn, a native of Belgium, enchanted the public with her charm, wit and elegance throughout the number of films she starred in during her 15 year career. Born in 1929, Hepburn grew up in England and the Netherlands, attending boarding school in the former. Hepburn and her mother faced austere times after the Nazis invaded England, stirring Audrey’s interest in the resistance movement. After World War II, Hepburn studied ballet in Amsterdam and London, the latter where she starred in theater productions such as High Button Shoes. It was her performance in the Broadway production, Gigi, that catapulted Hepburn onto Hollywood’s radar screen.

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Category : Community Member Projects and Updates | Education | Women | Blog
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